Cats, Cats, Cats! How To Care For Them All

Cats, Cats, Cats! How To Care For Them All

Cats, Cats, Cats! How To Care For Them All

Cats are a superb specimen of physical power, mental awareness, and tactile agility amongst domesticated animals. Cats grace the homes of people from all walks of life, and fill communities with life and energy. Living with cats indoors is a big challenge. Read here for excellent ideas on how to handle your hardheaded animal.

Groom your cat. Cats must be brushed and groomed frequently. If yu do this quite often, it will help them stay clean. Having a clean fur coat helps reduce the amount of hairballs that get spit up around the house. Keep your cat looking at its best by grooming it well.

If you have outdoor cats, be sure to discourage pests such as coyotes, possums and raccoons by bringing cat food indoors at night. Feed your cats first thing in the morning, and make sure there is no food left at nightfall. This will keep your cats safe from attack and illness.

An indoor cat who gets a taste of the outdoors will forever want to go outside. If you know your cat will always be an indoor cat, do your best to keep them from sneaking out. You can try to train your cat to stay in your yard when you are outside.

Make sure you have a good pet carrier or basket for transporting your cats from one location to the next. A proper carrier or basket should have enough room for them to turn around in comfortably. It should also be easy to clean. Make sure that it is lined with a blanket, cushion, or towel to help it stay comfortable and cozy for them when traveling.

Cats love to much on grass and plants such as catnip. There are plants however that are poisonous to cats. Chrysanthemums and holly are beautiful and common around the Holidays, but can be very toxic to cats. Other plants that are toxic or lethal include lilies, rhubarb and daffodils.

Take your cat to the vet periodically. A lot of cat owners tend to avoid the vet because it can be harder to get a cat ready to go anywhere she does not want to go! It is also easy to avoid the vet because cats seem so self-reliant. However, it’s smart to get your cat to the vet to avoid any problems.

Find a litter that your cat enjoys. Different litters have different smells and textures, so help your cat to find a litter that he is generally comfortable with using. Cats generally like to keep things the same though, so don’t experiment too often or your cat may avoid the litter box.

You can tap fellow cat owners for advice if you’re having problems with your pet. Other cat owners may have had experience with what you’re going through right now. The Internet has many cat forums where you can ask your questions, or simply speak with your vet.

Put the right amount of cat litter in the litter box. Some people try to get out of cleaning the box by putting too much litter in there. Cats don’t like walking on sand dunes! Two inches or so should be sufficient for the cat’s needs, and you just have to be vigilant about cleaning the box out.

When you are washing a cat litter box, it is a good idea to use basic soap and water. You may think that it would be more sanitary to use a harsh cleaner like bleach or ammonia, but all that will do is create a smell that the cat will find offensive.

If you have a kitten, a very important part of raising him is to get him socialized. This means making sure he is comfortable in many situations. These include: handling by humans, grooming and nail care, vet visits, and other social situations. The time to do this is between ten and twelve weeks of age.

When you bring home a new cat for the first time, the experience can be overwhelming for both of you. Instead of granting access to your entire home, introduce your pet to its new environment one room at a time. For example, you might place your cat’s carrier in your study or den. As long as the carrier door is open, you should be in the room with the animal.

By applying the tips that you have read, you’ll be outsmarting your cat before you know it. Soon, they will learn where to go and where to stay away from. Although training a cat is typically more difficult that training a dog, most cats end up trained and well mannered.

 

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